Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome (OHS)

OHS is defined as chronic daytime hypercapnia in obese patients (those with a BMI of > 30kg/m)2 with a daytime PaCO2 of over 45 mm Hg, after ruling out any other causes of hypoventilation.1

As many as 90% of patients with OHS also suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)2

Equipment replacement

Equipment replacement

Take the time to educate your patients on knowing how and when to replace components of their products, and how this relates to comfort and therapy effectiveness.

Getting the most out of ventilation therapy

Adhering to therapy is critical for patients receiving noninvasive ventilation.

Getting the most out of ventilation therapy

Getting the most out of ventilation therapy

Adhering to therapy is critical for patients receiving noninvasive ventilation.

Why treat OHS?

Why treat OHS?

Left untreated, OHS often results in right-sided heart failure1, pulmonary hypertension1 and polyglobulia,2 contributing to substantial morbidity and probable early mortality.1

What is OHS?

OHS is defined as chronic daytime hypercapnia (PaCO2 of over 45 mm Hg) in obese patients (those with a BMI of > 30kg/m)2 after ruling out any other causes of hypoventilation.1

OHS treatment options

OHS treatment options

Recommended treatment options for OHS include controlled weight loss and noninvasive ventilation.

Patient outcomes

Learn about the positive outcomes for OHS patients being treated with NIV.

Patient outcomes

Patient outcomes

Learn about the positive outcomes for OHS patients being treated with NIV.

References

  • 01

    Olson AL, Zwillich C.The obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Am J Med. 2005 Sep; 118(9): 948-56.

  • 02

    Kessler R, Chaouat A, Schinkewitch P, Faller M, Casel S, Krieger J, Weitzenblum E. (2001) The obesity-hypoventilation syndrome revisited: A prospective study of 34 consecutive cases. Chest 120:369–376.