Central sleep apnea and ASV

ASV therapy and central sleep apnea

Central sleep apnea (CSA) often goes underdiagnosed but affects a large portion of the sleep disordered breathing (SDB) population. CSA is characterized by low levels of carbon dioxide, an open airway and no drive to breathe. Some patients with central breathing disorders are most effectively treated with adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy,4 a form of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy that delivers auto-adjusting pressure support.

 

ASV therapy and central sleep apnea

Central sleep apnea (CSA) often goes underdiagnosed but affects a large portion of the sleep disordered breathing (SDB) population. CSA is characterized by low levels of carbon dioxide, an open airway and no drive to breathe. Some patients with central breathing disorders are most effectively treated with adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy,4 a form of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy that delivers auto-adjusting pressure support.

 

Prevalence of central breathing disorders

There is a high prevalence of central sleep apnea in patients with conditions such as heart failure, patients using opioids for chronic pain, and patients suffering from an injury to the brain such as a stroke. Central sleep apnea can also emerge after introducing CPAP therapy to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Patients with CSA often don’t snore, so the condition may go unnoticed.

Prevalence of central breathing disorders

There is a high prevalence of central sleep apnea in patients with conditions such as heart failure, patients using opioids for chronic pain, and patients suffering from an injury to the brain such as a stroke. Central sleep apnea can also emerge after introducing CPAP therapy to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Patients with CSA often don’t snore, so the condition may go unnoticed.

Prevalence of central breathing disorders

There is a high prevalence of central sleep apnea in patients with conditions such as heart failure, patients using opioids for chronic pain, and patients suffering from an injury to the brain such as a stroke. Central sleep apnea can also emerge after introducing CPAP therapy to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Patients with CSA often don’t snore, so the condition may go unnoticed.

Prevalence of central breathing disorders

There is a high prevalence of central sleep apnea in patients with conditions such as heart failure, patients using opioids for chronic pain, and patients suffering from an injury to the brain such as a stroke. Central sleep apnea can also emerge after introducing CPAP therapy to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Patients with CSA often don’t snore, so the condition may go unnoticed.

Who is ASV therapy suitable for?

ASV therapy is safe and efficacious for certain patient groups with central breathing disorders that can sometimes be challenging to treat, such as:5

  • Central sleep apnea (CSA)
  • Complex sleep apnea (CompSA)

  • Mixed sleep apnea

  • Periodic breathing

Note: ASV therapy is contraindicated in patients with chronic, symptomatic heart failure (NYHA 2–4) with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤ 45%) and moderate to severe predominant central sleep apnea.

Who is ASV therapy suitable for?

ASV therapy is safe and efficacious for certain patient groups with central breathing disorders that can sometimes be challenging to treat, such as:5

  • Central sleep apnea (CSA)
  • Complex sleep apnea (CompSA)

  • Mixed sleep apnea

  • Periodic breathing

Note: ASV therapy is contraindicated in patients with chronic, symptomatic heart failure (NYHA 2–4) with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤ 45%) and moderate to severe predominant central sleep apnea.

Stabilizing breathing for central sleep apnea

The ResMed AirCurve 10™ ASV algorithm learns the patient’s recent minute ventilation (MV) by mapping 13 points in the patient’s breath cycle. When pressure support or EPAP are necessary to stabilize ventilation, the algorithm responds rapidly mapping these seamlessly into the patient’s breath cycle.

The AirCurve 10 ASV learns, predicts, responds to and optimizes pressures to suit each patient’s own unique breathing pattern.

Stabilizing breathing for central sleep apnea

The ResMed AirCurve 10™ ASV algorithm learns the patient’s recent minute ventilation (MV) by mapping 13 points in the patient’s breath cycle. When pressure support or EPAP are necessary to stabilize ventilation, the algorithm responds rapidly mapping these seamlessly into the patient’s breath cycle.

The AirCurve 10 ASV learns, predicts, responds to and optimizes pressures to suit each patient’s own unique breathing pattern.

Stabilizing breathing for central sleep apnea

The ResMed AirCurve 10™ ASV algorithm learns the patient’s recent minute ventilation (MV) by mapping 13 points in the patient’s breath cycle. When pressure support or EPAP are necessary to stabilize ventilation, the algorithm responds rapidly mapping these seamlessly into the patient’s breath cycle.

The AirCurve 10 ASV learns, predicts, responds to and optimizes pressures to suit each patient’s own unique breathing pattern.

Stabilizing breathing for central sleep apnea

The ResMed AirCurve 10™ ASV algorithm learns the patient’s recent minute ventilation (MV) by mapping 13 points in the patient’s breath cycle. When pressure support or EPAP are necessary to stabilize ventilation, the algorithm responds rapidly mapping these seamlessly into the patient’s breath cycle.

The AirCurve 10 ASV learns, predicts, responds to and optimizes pressures to suit each patient’s own unique breathing pattern.

Free ASV education

Learn more about how ASV can help stabilize breathing in patients with central sleep apnea through this complimentary online e-learning course. Course content includes information on:

  • Pressure support with ASV
  • ASV algorithm
  • Management of EPAP in ASV
  • Response to apnea, hypopnea and periodic breathing
  • Back-up rate

You'll also have access to a recorded webinar on ASV. Webinar content includes:

  • A review of central sleep apnea pathophysiology
  • Information on the clinical indications for ASV therapy
  • An examination of the pathways to ASV for patients with CSA
  • A review of current clinical evidence for ASV therapy
  • An overview of the benefits of therapy monitoring

Fill out the form below to receive an email with access to our online, self-paced ASV e-learning course and recorded webinar. All fields are mandatory.

1. Javaheri S et al. The prevalence and natural history of Complex sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):205-211

2. Mogri M et al. Hypoxemia in patients on chronic opiate therapy with and without sleep apnea. Sleep Breath 2009;13:49-57

3. Johnson KG and Johnson DC. Frequency of sleep apnea in stroke and TIA patients: A meta-analysis. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(2):131–137

4. Cao M et al. A novel adaptive servoventilation (ASVAuto) for the treatment of central sleep apnea associated with chronic use of opioids. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(8):855-61

5. Adapted from Aurora RN et al. Updated adaptive servo-ventilation recommendations for the 2012 AASM guideline: “The Treatment of Central Sleep Apnea Syndromes in Adults: Practice Parameters with an Evidence-Based Literature Review and Meta-Analyses”. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(5):757–761