What causes snoring?

If you’ve been told you snore, chances are you already know you aren’t getting the type of quality sleep you need. When we’re asleep, the muscles in our necks relax. Sometimes, they relax so much that the upper airway (the nose and throat) partly closes, becoming too narrow for enough air to travel through to our lungs. This could be caused by temporary reasons, such as swollen tonsils or excess weight around the neck, or structural reasons, such as the shape of your nose or jaw. This narrowing of your airway causes a vibration in the throat, which causes the sound of snoring.

How snoring impacts you and your partner

Snoring not only disturbs your partner’s sleep, it also disrupts the sleep you’re getting, whether you realise it or not. Snoring means you’re not getting the right amount of oxygen into your system for your body to perform its important functions. It also means you’re likely to be waking up throughout the night without realising it. That could be getting in the way of the healthy sleep you need to lead a refreshed, energetic life. So regardless of what is specifically causing snoring for you, if you snore — or if you suspect you snore — consider it a sign that something might not be right and talk to your doctor today about doing a sleep study.

More healthy sleep